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The Coconut Cup

What is the Coconut Cup?


The coconut cup was a Western European creation introduced in the 15th and 16th centuries as a variety of standing cup. A standing cup is a tall cup in the style of a goblet that is frequently accompanied by a cover.


The standing cup has developed over time, seeming to have progressed from a simple combination of a wooden bowl with a cover, and gradually becoming the more extravagant cups often made with coconut or even ostrich egg, usually with a silver mount.


Medical Properties of the Coconut Cup


It was believed that the shell of the coconut would act as a natural defence against poison. The shell’s shape and scarcity meant that only the wealthy were able to mount the shells in precious metals and the vessels to be considered respectable and highly-treasured drinking vessels.


The popularity of coconut cups more or less faded away, finding a brief revival nearly three centuries later. Today, this makes coconut cups a difficult collectable to find in good condition.


Gemma Tubbrit

Gemma TubbritOnline Marketing Manager

Mini Bio: Gemma has many years experience in online marketing and social media. More recently she has focussed her skills within the more specialised jewellery and antique silver industries.

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Andrew Campbell started trading in antiques during the 1970s. Initially, Andrew lived in the South of England, travelling the country, searching for items of silver to buy. Andrew sold these items at various London markets and antique fairs. Over time, and through selling at a range of venues, Andrew built up a large and diverse customer base from private buyers to national and international trade customers.
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